Collaboration between Baghdad College of Medical Sciences / Nursing Department / Iraq and George Washington/ School of Nursing / USA

As a part of collaboration between Baghdad College of Medical Sciences / Nursing Department / Iraq and George Washington/ School of Nursing / USA a scientific presentation was held virtually on Thursday May 20, 2021 6pm (AST) on zoom. The moderator was Dr. Wafa A.K. Abbas/ Associate professor from Nursing Department / Baghdad College of Medical Sciences / Iraq and the presenter was Dr. Majeda Al-Banna / Associate professor from School of Nursing / George Washington University / USA, who presented : “Team-based learning: a strategy to foster active learning and improve pharmacology standardized test and final examination scores”. Faculty members from the two departments (Department of Nursing & Department of Pharmacy)/ Baghdad College of Medical Sciences/ Iraq was attended this scientific event.

Team-based learning (TBL) is an innovative teaching method, originally pioneered in business education, which has been increasingly used in medical settings. TBL allows a single teacher to incorporate small groups into a lecture hall or classroom and simultaneously conduct activities with all of the groups. Its focus on application of basic knowledge to solve complex real-world problems is ideally suited for basic science and clinical teaching.

Students become members of small, permanent teams to hold them accountable for each other’s learning. A student’s grade is based in part on their team’s performance during the course. In addition, students take regular quizzes on the reading (Readiness Assurance Tests, RATs). Because the RATs free the instructor from covering basic definitions and concepts, in-class activities then focus on team-based practice, application, and analysis. Students will provide regular feedback to their teammates on their relative contributions to the team’s performance. Many studies document the successes of team-based learning approaches, such as better student engagement in class, more collaboration among students, and deeper learning of complex skills